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Carmelo Anthony speaks on what's happening in Baltimore

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Kyle Terada-USA TODAY Sports

Every now and then, Carmelo Anthony will put together a 23-point, 9-rebound, 8-assist effort that tantalizes while taunting. Why don't we get more of multidimensional Melo? The hint of perspicacity makes the more frequent one-dimensional play all the more frustrating.

Every now and then, Carmelo will say something profoundly honest, humane, and meaningful, something that tantalizes while taunting. Why don't we get more of Care-melo and less digital athlete, or CEO-ing, or hat game? These glimpses of Melo the man make the more frequently reported/projected one-dimensionalism all the more wearying.

Last night, Anthony, a West Baltimore son, posted his thoughts on the turmoil on Instagram.

We all want Justice. And our city will get the answers we are looking for. My deepest sympathy goes out to the GRAY Family. To see my city in a State of Emergency is just shocking. We need to protect our city, not destroy it. What happens when we get the answers that we want, and the media attention is not there anymore? We go back to being the same ol Baltimore City again. If not yourself, then Think about the youth. How this will impact them. Let's build our city up not tear it down. Although, we want justice, let's look at the real issues at hand. For example, When was the last school built in Baltimore? That's just one example. I know my community is fed up. I'm all about fighting for what we believe in. The anger, the resentment, the neglect that our community feels right now, will not change over night. Continue, fighting for what you believe in. But remember, it takes no time to destroy something. But, it can take forever to build it back up. Peace7. #Thisonehitshome #BeMore #LetsNotFallForTheTrap "Please Understand What State Of Emergency Mean"(Destroy and Conquer) #StayMe7o

A photo posted by @carmeloanthony on

Athletes often face a catch-22 when they speak about sports: too bland or cliched and they're fake; too honest and they're distracting divas hungry for the spotlight. The same goes for social commentary -- toe the mainstream line and they're just protecting their brand; take an unpopular stance and they've wandered out of their element, and should stick to playing a game for a living, and be grateful for it. I found Carmelo's take to be sincere. There was wisdom in his words. There was balance.

"We need to protect our city, not destroy it," he wrote. He showed a big-picture awareness, a concern for the moments after the moment: "What happens when we get the answers that we want, and the media attention is not there anymore? We go back to being the same ol Baltimore City again...[t]hink about the youth. How will this impact them. Let's build our city up not tear it down."

He wasn't spitting platitudes and he wasn't pretending he has all the answers. Instead, he resurrected one of the first casualties of large-scale violence: he asked a question. "When was the last school built in Baltimore?"

He wasn't dismissive. He wasn't naive. He wasn't Michael Jordan saying Republicans buy shoes, too. Carmelo was spitting real, nuanced thoughts.

"The anger, the resentment, the neglect that our community feels right now, will not change over night. Continue, fighting for what you believe in."

Then he spoke truth to the power of the moment: "But remember, it takes time to destroy something. But, it can take forever to build it back up. Peace7."

I tend to be a Carmelo defender, but I can't say I "love" the man. Yet after hearing him speak out, I like and respect him a whole lot more. I hope more athletes use their platform and power to speak truth to the powers that be. I hope Baltimore gets what it wants. Not when the media's there to report it, either. I hope that city builds itself back up. If it does take forever, no better time to start than now.